KodaiMercury

Locals protest in front of of thermometer factory, which is accused of mercury poisoning, in Kodaikanal. Protesters are seen displaying the photos of people dying due to alleged mercury exposure (Photo: DC)

Scientific community backs fight against MNC – Deccan Chronicle

In a rare gesture, the international scientific community is joining hands to express solidarity with ex-employees and local residents exposed to toxic levels of mercury in Kodaikanal — the princess of hill stations — where Hindustan Unilever Ltd (HUL) allegedly committed the unpardonable sin of dumping toxic mercury close to human settlements that threaten the lives of hundreds of people and virtually turns Kodai into the ‘Bhopal of Tamil Nadu’.

Protesters stage a demonstration in front of the closed HUL thermometer factory in Kodaikanal.

No answers still from Unilever – Deccan Chronicle

The Anglo-Dutch consumer goods giant Unilever, which owns 67 per cent stake in Hindustan Unilever Limited (HUL), still lives in denial about allegations of mercury poisoning in Kodaikanal. Replying to questions raised by campaigners in the United Kingdom for justice in Kodaikanal durig the recent annual general body meeting held in Leatherhead, UK, on April 30, Unilever CEO Paul Polman said it was a long-term issue and that they wanted to resolve it.

Protesters in Kodaikanal highlight the UN’s Minamata Convention on Mercury

Poison case puts Polman’s green boasts on the line – The Sunday Times

Every day Daisy Varghese is haunted by the thought that her former job in a factory may have killed her six-year-old son.

Between 1996 and 1999, Varghese, now 35, was a contractor at a mercury thermometer factory run by what is now Hindustan Unilever — a company majority-owned by Unilever, the FTSE 100 consumer goods giant.

She worked in a section close to the factory’s toxic “mercury” area, and claims she was given a coat but no cap, facemask or gloves.